The start of the 10God/Glitch Trubisky era was filled with a lot of excitement and promise, but eventually was not enough to get the job done with the Chicago Bears falling to the Minnesota Vikings on MNF 20-17. Trubisky went 12-25 for 128 years with one touchdown and one interception. The interception came with just over two minutes left in the game, virtually ending the Bears’ chance of a victory with the Vikings later kicking the game winning field goal with 16 seconds left in the game.

While the Bears showed a lot of promise in this one, they also showed why they are a 1-4 football team. They are non-existent in the receiving game, something that they are obviously going to have to figure out if they are going to be able to give Mitch Trubisky any chance to succeed. Secondly, while the defense played surprisingly well on Monday, it is hard to win a football game if you can’t turn the ball over. The defensive line was flying towards the football the whole game, especially rookie Leonard Floyd who has the look of a really special piece for the Bears moving forward. However, the defense HAS to be able to force some turnovers to give the team a chance to win. Third, penalties KILLED Chicago Monday night. Markus Wheaton, one of those non-existent wide receivers, had a killer holding penalty that erased a 42-yard Jordan Howard touchdown, and even the promising Leonard Floyd committed a brutal defensive holding penalty that gave the Vikings another chance to score and ultimately win the game. Can’t have those kind of penalties if you want to succeed as a team in this league. On the flip side, the Bears showed off some unexpected flare on Monday, scoring a touchdown on a fake punt and executing one of the best two-point conversions of all time:

As for the anticipation leading into the game, Trubisky played pretty solid all things considered in his first regular-season game in the NFL. He looked comfortable both in the pocket and on the run, connecting on a lot of good passes to below-average targets. He did throw some risky throws, one being his only touchdown pass of the night to Zach Miller that should have been an interception in the endzone, and the other being the ultimately game-deciding interception to safety Harrison Smith. Nothing overly-concerning to say about Trubisky, just a lot of optimism, something that Bears fans were dying to get out of the second-overall pick.

In conclusion, the Bears are still a pretty poor football team even with the switch at quarterback. It is going to be a long season, but taking into account how well Trubisky and the defense played with all of the injuries that have happened on both sides of the ball, there appears to be some sort of light at the end of the tunnel, especially if Chicago is able to (against the laws of Chicago Bears front office-physics) somehow get a good return on an almost certain early draft pick that they will get in the draft next year.

 

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