The Golden State Warriors, Cleveland Indians, and New Zealand All Blacks have a message for Hillary Clinton. Never get complacent, no matter how heavily the odds appear to be stacked in your favor.

Losing is a difficult part of life, especially after over a year of people patting you on the back assuring a blowout victory. Now that Hillary Clinton has given her concession speech, the country can move forward with president-elect Donald Trump. That sentence just does not seem right. All the Democrats had to do was not nominate a criminal. I would have much rather woken up this morning to Joe Biden, John Kasich, or almost anyone else as president-elect.

But alas, a reality star is now the leader of the free world. Social media has blamed third-party voters, FBI Director James Comey, and countless others. Keyboard warriors have attacked the supposedly racist, misogynistic, (no longer) silent majority of voters that took their frustrations to the ballot rather than the internet. Where is the accountability? Has it crossed any Hillary supporters minds that maybe, just maybe, the fault lies with their biased national committee’s selection of a candidate that a considerable portion of the voting public does not trust? What kind of person does one have to be to lose to Donald Trump? As my friend Ryan Ramsay so perfectly summed it up yesterday: tonight shows that no matter how much you tweet, you still only get one vote just like everyone else.

After tough losses on a national stage, head coaches and star players regularly take the podium and take the blame, owning up to the mistakes their teams made. Last night, we stayed up into the wee hours of the morning only to have John Podesta tell everyone to go home and get some sleep. Never did I think that I would liken a presidential candidate to Cam Newton, but Clinton’s refusal to engage her audience after a stunning defeat is just plain cowardly.

I have long maintained that this election would bring to light the importance of a legitimate third party or alternative option. After what the now disgraced media tells us is an unexpected result, the American public has to wake up. A Donald Trump presidency will not be as catastrophic as your Facebook friends make it out to be. Do not listen to celebrities’ political opinions, they have a warped view and give off an air of smug superiority. Listen to blue collar workers and small business owners.

Lost in the fray is the election of Ilhan Omar, the first Somali-born legislator in the history of the United States. Just days after Donald Trump unwisely exclaimed that Somali immigration was a threat to Minnesota, Omar was given the opportunity to be a “voice for the marginalized” after receiving almost 80 percent of the vote. Whether the country that I love took a large leap backwards remains to be seen, but Omar’s victory is a symbolic one in the face of bigotry, if nothing else.

The election is just another example of wildly improbable events happening in the sporting world and on the global stage. What a year 2016 has been. It has not always been great, but oh boy it sure has been memorable. We have Brexit, Leicester City won the EPL, the 73-win Warriors blew a 3-1 lead to give Cleveland a long-awaited title, the Cubs overcame a 3-1 lead to the Cleveland I-words to end an even longer title drought, the Ireland national rugby team beat the New Zealand All Blacks for the first time in 111 years (nearly thirty meetings), and come January Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States of America.

Also, never in a million years…

 

photo credit: neverbutterfly post-DNC rally via photopin (license)

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